Stuart Littlewood is a marketing specialist turned writer-photographer in the UK. His articles are published widely on the web. He is author of the book Radio Free Palestine, which tells the plight of the Palestinians under occupation.

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Agent Cameron’s latest ‘UJIA’ dinner speech

EDITOR’S NOTE: Readers are invited to fill in blanks-between-the-brackets with their own responses, then mail them to Agent Cameron and his constituency chairman.

 

Israel risks playing into Iran’s hands by launching a strike against its nuclear programme, Prime Minister David Cameron has warned.

Such a scandalous performance must have been scripted by Mark Regev‘s office, or by some spotty student just awarded a Hasbara (Israeli propaganda) Fellowship by The Israel Project and now appointed Communications Director at Number 10.

The dinner guests were no doubt laughing all the way home. And Tel Aviv will be cock-a-hoop. Their willing fool, their prime-ministerial stooge is firmly on-board and their passport to further infiltration and domination in the UK is assured. They also have their green light for more crimes in the Holy Land.

Cameron came from nowhere with no track-record and, with Jewish money behind him. [See: Special report: Team Cameron’s big Jewish backers,] suddenly burst onto the political stage as leader of the Conservative Party. His only claim to fame up to then was that he’d been schooled at Eton and the notorious Bullingdon Club. Inevitably he became prime minister.

What’s truly worrying is Agent Cameron’s statement:

“There is no contradiction between being a proud Jew, a committed Zionist and a loyal British citizen.”

Ye gods! How can someone who is committed to a foreign military power like the Zionist entity possibly be loyal to Britain or any other sensible country?

Those words give Cameron’s own position away – he’s a self-declared Zionist and, from his remarks here, an Israel-firster putting Israel’s interests, however unlawful and menacing, ahead of the interests of the UK and allowing his country to be drawn into conflict with Israel’s enemies such as Iran.

Of course Iran is no enemy of Britain but soon will be if you persist with economic sanctions that needlessly hurt the Iranian people and repeat the suffering you inflicted on Iraq’s women and children for 12 years.

Agent Cameron is bent on rewarding Israel’s crimes and defending Israel’s criminals.

This is a written version of the speech given by David Cameron: http://www.number10.gov.uk/news/ujia/ 

This is a check against delivery version of the Prime Minister’s speech:

 

David Cameron’s Speech at Annual dinner of United Jewish Israel Appeal

Monday 15 October 2012

British Prime Minister David Cameron speaks during the annual United Jewish Israel Appeal (UJIA) dinner in central London. Cameron urged Israel not to launch a military attack on Iran over its contested nuclear programme and said sanctions should be given time to work. Photograph: Ben Stansall/AFP/Getty Images

“With me, you have a Prime Minister whose belief in Israel is unbreakable and whose commitment to Israel’s security is non-negotiable.

I will always stand by the Jewish people. And it is humbling to be here tonight and to be called a friend.

Here in this room, we have many of the people who are determined to build the strongest possible relationship between Britain and Israel.

The business leaders who have taken our trade to well over $8 billion a year and made Britain the second biggest export market for Israel in the world.

[then you have considerable leverage]

Matthew Gould and Daniel Taub, United Jewish Israel Appeal.

The scientists who are taking forward an ambitious programme of joint research as part of the UK-Israel Life Sciences Council, which includes no less than four Nobel Prize winners.

The leading academics who are helping to forge new partnerships between Manchester and the Weizmann Institute, Oxford and Ben Gurion, Cambridge and Tel Aviv.

The hi-tech specialists who are making a reality of the UK/Israel Tech Hub – the first of its kind in the world.

And, of course, our two ambassadors – Matthew Gould and Daniel Taub who are doing so much to help build this partnership between our countries.

UJIA (United Jewish Israel Appeal )

Mick, Doug – you have made an inspirational contribution and I am sure that everyone will want to join me in paying tribute to your leadership and hard work over these past few years.

I am a big admirer of what the UJIA does both here in Britain and in Israel. Let me explain why.

First, the Jewish community in Britain is a role model for successful integration because you understand that as well as being part of a community with a common faith you are also part of a wider community – that of our country.

You epitomise the philanthropic spirit that is so central to Jewish teaching and which sees so many Jewish people give generously – not just to Jewish charities but to all charitable causes.

And through your support for Jewish youth movements and educational programmes for young people at both Jewish and mainstream schools and through your Summer Tours to Israel for 16 year olds and gap year students you continue to show each new generation that it is possible to be both a proud Jew steeped in the values of the Jewish people and a proud British citizen.

Yes, you can love this country, take pride in its history, celebrate its Olympics, even cry with its football fans every other year. There is no contradiction between being a proud Jew, a committed Zionist and a loyal British citizen.

[the Zionist entity is a foreign military power – how can you be a true Zionist and a loyal British subject?]

In the past, governments allowed a flawed state multiculturalism that said we should encourage different cultures to live separate lives, apart from each other and the mainstream.

I don’t subscribe to that. And neither do you. I believe we have to end the passive tolerance of segregated communities behaving in ways that run completely counter to our values.

Let’s be clear what that means. It means getting preachers of hate out of our country.
It means proscribing organizations that incite terrorism. And it means zero tolerance for any form of anti-Semitism, especially on our campuses.

And to those in Britain’s universities and trades unions who want to boycott Israel and consign it to an international ghetto, I say not only will this Government never allow you to shut down 60 years worth of vibrant exchange and partnership that does so much to make both our countries stronger but I also say this: we know what you are doing – trying to delegitimise the State of Israel – and we will not have it.

[just exercising discretion and choice, or will you rob your people of that?]

SECURING ISRAEL’S FUTURE

I’m a fan of what you do in Israel too. The focus you have given to the Galilee has ensured that UJIA’s funding reaches those communities that most need it.

And the projects you’ve supported touch the lives, not just of those directly involved, but of all Israel. The medical school in Safad which teaches Jews and Arabs alike. Western Galilee College, where more than 30 per cent of the intake is Arab, and almost half of that Arab women. Or, of course, the high school in Shlomi. There in the shadow of the hills from which Hezbollah launched its missiles you brought an army of teachers and the hope of a new generation.

That is the vision, strength and courage on which our future depends. And that is what the UJIA is all about. Now, tonight I want to talk about three key steps to secure Israel’s future.

Standing up to Iran, Seizing the opportunities presented by the Arab Spring and the spread of democracy in the wider region, And making the hard choices needed to resolve the conflict with the Palestinians.

Let me take each in turn.IRAN

First, Iran. Let’s be clear about the facts. Iran is flouting six United Nations resolutions. The Regime’s claim that its nuclear programme is intended purely for civilian purposes is not remotely credible.

[is that what the intelligence agencies are saying?]

And it has shown its violent agenda by exporting terror and violence to Iraq, to Syria, to Gaza, to Lebanon and to many peace-loving countries across the world.

Iran is not just a threat to Israel. It is a threat to the world. Now there are some who say nothing will work – and that we have to learn to live with a nuclear armed Iran.

[is that what the intelligence agencies are saying?]

I say we don’t and we shouldn’t.

But at the same time I also refuse to give in to those who say that the current policy is fatally flawed, and that we have no choice but military action. A negotiated settlement remains within Iran’s grasp.

But until they change course, we have a strategy of ever tougher sanctions. Just today, Britain has secured a further round of new sanctions through the EU Foreign Affairs Council. And these relentless sanctions are having an impact no-one expected a year ago.

[why aren’t you making friends and trading with Iran? That’s the classic way to influence other nations]

They have slowed the nuclear programme. Iranian oil exports have fallen by 45 per cent. That’s 1 million fewer barrels a day and $8 billion in revenues lost every quarter.

[that’s going to hurt their women and kids]

The Rial has plummeted – losing around half its value between May and September.

[that’s going to hurt their women and kids]

Inflation is soaring – thought to be as much as 50 per cent. And the Iranian Regime has had to establish an economic austerity taskforce to manage the pressure they have brought on their own people.

[no, YOU brought that pressure on their women and kids quite needlessly]

Most significantly, there are signs that the Iranian people are beginning to question the Regime’s strategy with even pro-regime groups protesting at the actions of the Government.

It’s mind boggling that the leaders of a nation so rich in oil have succeeded in turning their country into a banana republic desperately trying to put rockets into space while their people suffer.

[what a silly remark from the leader whose country is stuck in recession even without sanctions]

The Iranian regime is under unprecedented pressure and faces an acute dilemma. They are leading their people to global isolation and an economic collapse. And they know it.

[Britain has been trying for decades to isolate Iran. What did Britain do to Mossadeq’s fledgling democracy? Remember the sanctions, blockades and overthrow? And how many times has a British foreign secretary or prime minister visited Iran since 1979, the year of the Revolution?]

They know too that there is a simple way to bring sanctions to an end. By giving the international community the confidence we need that they are not and will not develop a nuclear weapon.

I have said to Prime Minister Netanyahu that now is not the time for Israel to resort to military action. Beyond the unpredictable dangers inherent in any conflict, the other reason is this:

At the very moment when the Regime faces unprecedented pressure and the people are on the streets and when Iran’s only real ally in Syria is losing his grip on power a foreign military strike is exactly the chance the Regime would look for to unite his people against a foreign enemy.

We shouldn’t give them that chance. We need the courage to give these sanctions time to work.  But let me also say this. In the long term, if Iran makes the wrong choice, nothing is off the table. A nuclear armed Iran is a threat to Israel. And a threat to the world. And this country will work unwaveringly to prevent that from happening.

[not nearly as threatening as nuclear armed Israel which refused to sign the non-proliferation treaty and refuses inspection]

OPEN SOCIETIES

Let me turn to the changing events in the wider region. I have no illusions about the dangers that political transition can bring in the Arab spring countries.

And I understand why instability can be a great cause for concern. I understand how dark things were for Israel when surrounded by enemies on every border. And I understand how Israelis feel when gas masks are handed out to families; and car parks are converted into bomb shelters.

But I passionately believe that what we are seeing through the Arab Spring need not be a new threat to Israel’s security. Democracy and open societies are not the problem – they can be a big part of the solution.

Yes, there are those who believe that in a volatile region only an authoritarian strong man can maintain stability and security. But when brutal dictators suppress their people in the name of stability *, the end result is a region is that more dangerous – not less.

[* not forgetting brutal occupiers who suppress other peoples in the name of ‘security’]

More dangerous because these regimes abuse the Palestinian cause to smother their own people’s hopes and aspirations, dealing with frustration at home by whipping up anger against their neighbours, Israel and the West. And more dangerous too, because people denied a job and a voice are given no alternative but a dead end choice between dictatorship or extremism.

[like the Palestinians?]

Now, of course, many fear that elections can open the door to Islamist parties whose values are incompatible with truly open societies. But the answer is not to oppose elections. The answer is to respect the outcome of elections. And then judge governments by what they do.

[that would make a nice change – what chance did Britain give Hamas to show how they could govern?]

For example, there are big questions facing President Mursi in Egypt. We want to know if he will live up to his commitments to protect the rule of law for all citizens, defend the rights of minorities and allow women to play a full part in society. And I challenged him personally on these points when I met him in New York last month.

But when he re-launches Operation Eagle to try and do something about the lawlessness in the Sinai, we should welcome that. And when he goes to Tehran and speaks the truth to that regime about its despicable actions in Syria in support of Assad, we should welcome that too.

But if the Islamists attempt to undermine the stability of other countries or encourage terrorism instead of peace and conflict instead of partnership then we must and will oppose them. And that is why we will not waver from our insistence that Hamas gives up violence and that the rockets from Gaza must stop. Hamas must not be allowed to dictate the way forwards for Israelis and Palestinians.

[why? Self-defense against a brutal occupier is their right. When will Cameron insist on Israel giving up violence and withdrawing to the  1949 borders?]

Of course, the Arab Spring presents huge challenges. But if we can show the strength and courage to engage with new democratic governments, their chance to establish the building blocks of democracy, fair economies and open societies offers the greatest opportunity for stability and peace in a generation.

MEPP (Middle East Peace Process)

That brings me to the Palestinian Territories and the peace process. We can’t advocate democracy and open societies in one breath and then cite the need for stability as an excuse for why the Palestinians shouldn’t renew their democracy too.

It’s now seven years since Palestinians voted for a President and six since parliamentary elections. The Palestinian leadership needs to refresh its mandate and show it has the consent of its people, starting with municipal elections later this month. And it needs to resolve the situation in Gaza and restore to Palestinians a unified, leadership able to deliver peaceful resolution of the conflict with Israel.

[and Britain, the US and the UN need to restore to the Palestinians a unified territory on internationally recognized borders with unfettered movement of goods and people]

So Palestinian reconciliation and Palestinian elections are key points on the path to peace – because without consent there can never be credible negotiation.

[there can be no peace under occupation or blockade]

It will require great strength and courage to take the hard choices needed to resolve the conflict with the Palestinians

[no, only common decency].

And let me say this: I know it takes two to negotiate. So let me tell President Abbas something very clearly there is no path to statehood except through talks with Israel.

[it’s been tried, it doesn’t work, Israel has refused to allow the Palestinians a State.]

So if the Palestinian plan is simply posturing with the UN rather than negotiating with Israel, Britain will never support it.

[it’s been tried, it doesn’t work, Israel has refused to allow the Palestinians a State.]

And let me say this to the Palestinians too. Britain will never support anyone who sponsors a football tournament named after a suicide bomber who killed 20 Israelis in a restaurant. We will not tolerate incitement to terrorism.

[so why support the terror state of Israel?]

But in the search for peace both sides have to make hard choices. And just as President Abbas has followed through his commitment to non-violence with real progress on the West Bank so Israel needs a real drive to improve life for ordinary Palestinians.

That means more support for economic development in the West Bank, relaxing restrictions on Gaza, ending the demolition of Palestinian homes, and yes, it means meeting Israel’s obligations under the Roadmap and under international law to halt settlement building.

[relaxing restrictions? You mean ending restrictions and restoring unfettered access and movement].

[and don’t forget all Israel’s other obligations under international law]

Britain’s position will not change. Settlements beyond the green line are illegal.

I know how hard the concessions needed for peace can be. But the truth is, time is running out for a two state solution – and with it Israel’s best chance to live in peace with its neighbors.

CONCLUSION

Brett, in your introduction you said that support for Israel was in the DNA of the political party I lead. It is. But I believe it is in the DNA of the country I lead too.

[rubbish]

That is why Britain will always stand by Israel, protect Israel, and work with Israel on the path to peace.

[you haven’t yet mapped out a credible path to peace]

I long for the day when I can come to a dinner like this and not have to talk about the threats to Israel. I long too for the day when making statements in support of Israel is as unnecessary as going to see President Obama and saying I support America’s right to exist.

For now, Israel will continue to face acute threats and a hard road to peace. But with strength and courage we can, together, stand up to Iran. We can, together, seize the opportunities presented by the spread of democracy in the wider region. And we can together take the hard choices needed to resolve the conflict with the Palestinians.

[that’ll be the day!]

So let me conclude by wishing you all a slightly belated shana tova and let us hope that it will be a sweet year for the British Jewish community and the Jewish people in the State of Israel. And one which brings us closer to the peace and security for Israel that its people so richly deserve.”

[what they richly deserve is something else entirely]

 

 



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Posted by on October 18, 2012, With 0 Reads, Filed under Americas, Australia & Oceana, China & Asia, Europe, Middle East, World Affairs. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0. You can leave a response or trackback to this entry

3 Responses to "Agent Cameron’s latest ‘UJIA’ dinner speech"

  1. Adrian  October 19, 2012 at 6:03 am

    “A nation can survive its fools, and even the ambitious. But it cannot survive treason from within. An enemy at the gates is less formidable, for he is known and carries his banner openly. But the traitor moves amongst those within the gate freely, his sly whispers rustling through all the alleys, heard in the very halls of government itself. For the traitor appears not a traitor; he speaks in accents familiar to his victims, and he wears their face and their arguments, he appeals to the baseness that lies deep in the hearts of all men. He rots the soul of a nation, he works secretly and unknown in the night to undermine the pillars of the city, he infects the body politic so that it can no longer resist. A murderer is less to fear. The traitor is the plague.”

    Marcus Tullius Cicero
    (106-43 B.C.) Roman Statesman, Philosopher and Orator

    • blackbird9  October 21, 2012 at 7:39 pm

      Nice to see we are on the same page . . . 🙂

      Late last night (early this morning), I posted this same quote on another thread.

      It was one of those pleasant surprises when I read your comment on this “similar” thread.

      Thank you. . . . 🙂

      peace.

  2. DaveE  October 18, 2012 at 4:26 pm

    This is truly disturbing. Thanks, I think. I guess it’s best to know, even if we’re REALLY screwed.

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